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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
. that was 1960, where the jfk-richard nixon debates where richard nixon appeared sweaty and uncomfortable and then 2000 where al gore was seen as sighing and sort of dismissive of then texas governor george bush. so when you asked jen and barbara whether they were giving their candidates advice on things that are aesthetic, they should be. >> that's what we all remember, right, do you wear the gray suit on black and white tv, nixon. let me ask this, because you've done a lot of work on this. super pacs and the candidates are competing for money, which a lot of people might not realize. but the campaign can cover whatever it wants with the money, the super pac not linked to the campaign at all so not ideal for the campaign. the romney campaign, $86 million raised. the pro romney super pac, $41 million. and american ross kroeds, affiliate with karl rove, $58.7 million. so you can add that up and get a big number or say if karl rove doesn't like how mitt romney does tomorrow night, he could give a lot of that $60 million, the biggest chunk of change, to, i don't know, senate candidates, cong
. the famous case of john kennedy and richard nixon in 1960, even reagan and carter in 1980, the confidence and ease that ronald reagan projected and jimmy carter looked defensive. that's the impression that often lasts. >> even al gore and george w. bush is a good example of body language so much during those debates. al gore was up in the polls and had a series of very poor debate performances. >> al gore had been a very effe effective, aggressive debater. he was seen in the first debate as too aggressive. the sighs and the rest. in the second debate he was almost too laid back. by the third he had a just right approach by that time. those performances and all the other factors in the 2000 election held him back. >> humor. >> humor can be very important but it's something that has to -- some humorous lines probably are prescripted. there you go again, reagan, most people feel, was prepared. >> remember what lloyd benson said about -- >> yes. >> dan quayle. >> that famous line. i knew jack kennedy. jack kennedy was a friend of mine. senator, you are no jack kennedy. >> i just reread about
these other people were squabbling amongst each other. the famous case of john kennedy and richard nixon. even reagan and carter in 1980. the confidence and ease that ronald reagan projected and jimmy carter looked a little bit defensive. that's the impression that lasts. >> even al gore and george w. bush i think is a good example of body language told so much during those debates. al gore was up in the polls and had a series of very poor debate performances. >> al gore had been a very effective, aggressive debater. in the first debate, he was seen as being too aggressive. the famous sighs and all the rest. in the second debate, he was almost too laid back. by the third he had a kind of just right approach, but by that time, those performances and all the other factors in the 2011 election held him back. >> how important is humor? >> it can be very important, but it's something that has to -- i guess some humorous lines probably are prescripted. there you go again by reagan most people feel w prepared. that, of course, is the magic. >> remember what lloyd benson said about dan quayle and pres
count above all. jfk, tan. nixon, just out of the hospital, pale, refusing professional makeup. reagan's people fussed more over his than mondale's did over his. reagan always had a glass of wine just before going on to get those rosy cheeks. lesson four, real debating? so far, after 52 years, not actually required here. so relax. learn your lines. don't sneak in a look at your wristwatch. because that will definitely hurt you. beside, 90 minutes and you are done. possibly for good. john donvan, abc news, washington. >> possibly for good. nice line there. >> that's how rob gets his cheeks nice and takes it from the old gipper. it works. i think there's so much choreography that goes behind the debates. iasciwhat made-for-tv evehey first started with nixon and kennedy. >>> this morning on "world news now" -- getting ready for the duel in denver. >> we'll see how both candidates are preparing for the first presidential debate coming up tomorrow night. it is tuesday, october 2nd. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." >>> good morning, everybody. i'm rob nelson. >> good to
presidential campaigns since 1968. and humphrey and nixon. so i've been watching debates throughout the years, and it's my super bowl. i mean, i get all excited. i'm so thrilled that the debate is tomorrow, i can hardly wait. so i have observed many of the debates, not just based on my experience, but there is always something, people, after i did the debate, would come and tell me that they were concerned about things that the candidates did. >> like what? >> not what they said. >> like looking at a watch? >> like george bush looking at his watch, and standing near his stool the entire debate. and bill clinton wading right up to the audience questioners showing his compassion and feeling for these people. and it jumped through the screen. and i've had people -- i've had people, you know, these days, telling me, i want to see how they do. it is not -- i want it hear what they have to say about how to solve the economy. they want to see how they do. and i think a lot of things -- the conventional wisdom is that all the debates do is reinforce your ideas about a candidate that you support, or d
for him. which lead to lesson three. appearances count above all. jfk, tan. nixon just out of the hospital, pale. refusing proquestional make -- refusing professional makeup. reagan's people fussed more over his than mondale's did over his. reagan always had a glass of wean just before going on to get rosie cheeks. lesson four, real debate sowing -- lesson four, real debating, so far after 52 years, not actually required here. so relax. learn your lines. don't sneak in a look at your wristwatch. because that will definitely hurt you. beside, 90 minutes and you are done. possibly for good. john donvan, abc news, washington. >> possibly for good. nice line there. >> that's how rob gets his cheeks nice and rosie. takes it from the old gipper. >> nice, glass of wine, relaxes you, gives you the blush. it works. i think there is so much choreography that goes behind the debates. it really is fascinating what a made-for-tv event they have become since 1960 when they first started nixon/kennedy. >> i imagine you would be a great debater. >> go ahead and say it. >> no. >> a joke you, know you want
. the raging unpopular war in vietnam consumed the bitter campaign battle between president nixon and george mcgovern. suddenly october 26th, 12 days before the election, vietnam negotiator henry kissinger made a surprise statement >> we believe peace is at hand. >> the first so-called october surprise, late in the game campaign event with a significant impact on the election. >> in order to win re-election for nixon in 1972, they needed to end the vietnam war. this was sort of the definitive statement. >> the most famous october surprise was in 1980 and the surprise was what did not happen. 52 u.s. hostages held in iran were not released before the election in spite of president carter's efforts. instead, they were freed as soon as ronald reagan was inaugurated, delayed freeing the hostages. >> it fed into the whole dynamic of the 1980 race in the sense that jimmy carter was a stumbling, ineffective president. >> reporter: fast forward to 1992. president george h.w. bush was already on the ropes against bill clinton over a sluggish economy. when casper weinberger was implicated in the iran-con
about presidential debates because i've watched them since the first ones with nixon and kennedy. the first ground is be who you are. you're not going to change somebody at his age who's done things very successfully. don't take advice from consultants who want you to somehow imaginely be non-mitt. my second advice is walk in determined to draw very sharp, clear lines with president obama. i frankly was startled by the ad you just showed a minute ago in which romney is in a sense embracing obama. we both care about the middle class. i don't know why he's saying that. if president obama cared about the middle class, why did the price of gasoline go to an all-time high? why do we have the largest debt in american history which the middle class will pay on for the entire rest of their lifetime? if president obama cared about the middle class, why have we had the longest unemployment rate? i think it's a mistake to be clever. i think he ought to draw clear sharp signs say here's where we've been under obama, here's where we go under omney. do you want obama stagnation? he's got to be
am. >> presidential diet dibaits have actually determined how nixon and gore came off as likable or not. >> 2008 i host a show on cnn called what they didn't talk about. that's also going to be key. i hope you really do have some expansive issues beyond the same kind of stuff we always have been hearing. i'll be paying attention to the next day is what they didn't focus on. >> "american idol" america now? back in those days it wasn't an "american idol" mencht it took less to entertain people. do you think voters want to be entertained and wooed? >> some voters are undecided and people want to hear specifics from the candidates. by this time most americans have made up their mind. and that's why they don't matter as much as they used to. people are coming to the debates with with their partisan jerseys on, rooting for their guy. big diences, but not a lot of people in recent elections are making up their mind based on them. >> let me disagree this one time with ryan lizza. the reagan can/ca/carter debate week before. >> this is 2012. because of early voting, saturation of televisi
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)